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Vidéotheque

Since 2002 Perimeter Institute has been recording seminars, conference talks, public outreach events such as talks from top scientists using video cameras installed in our lecture theatres.  Perimeter now has 7 formal presentation spaces for its many scientific conferences, seminars, workshops and educational outreach activities, all with advanced audio-visual technical capabilities. 

Recordings of events in these areas are all available and On-Demand from this Video Library and on Perimeter Institute Recorded Seminar Archive (PIRSA)PIRSA is a permanent, free, searchable, and citable archive of recorded seminars from relevant bodies in physics. This resource has been partially modelled after Cornell University's arXiv.org. 

Accessibly by anyone with internet, Perimeter aims to share the power and wonder of science with this free library.

 

  

 

 

Mardi mai 25, 2021

I discuss the question how string theory achieves a sum over bulk geometries with fixed asymptotic boundary conditions. I analyze this problem with the help of the tensionless string on AdS3xS3xT4 (with one unit of NS-NS flux) that was recently understood to be dual to the symmetric orbifold of T4. I argue that large stringy corrections around a fixed background can be interpreted as different semiclassical geometries, thus making a sum over semi-classical geometries superfluous.

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Jeudi mai 20, 2021

Gravitational wave observations are beginning to reveal the nature of the dark side of our universe. The Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors have observed dozens of binary black hole mergers during the recent third observing run and, with planned sensitivity improvements, expect to observe significantly more binary black hole mergers in future observing runs. The combination of the increased number of detections  and the sheer volume of data associated with each detection provides a significant data analysis challenge.

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Jeudi mai 20, 2021
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A fundamental problem of quantum gravity is to understand the quantum evolution of black holes.  While aspects of their evolution are understood asymptotically, a more detailed description of their evolving wavefunction can be provided.  This gives a possible foundation for studying effects that unitarize this evolution, which in turn may provide important clues regarding the quantum nature of gravity.

 

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Mercredi mai 19, 2021
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With the race for quantum computers in full swing, researchers became interested in the question of what happens if we replace a supervised machine learning model with a quantum circuit. While such "supervised quantum models" are sometimes called "quantum neural networks", their mathematical structure reveals that they are in fact kernel methods with kernels that measure the distance between data embedded into quantum states. This talk gives an informal overview of the link, and discusses the far-reaching consequences for quantum machine learning.

 

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Mardi mai 18, 2021
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Detecting ultralight axion dark matter has recently become one of the benchmark goals of future direct detection experiments. I will discuss a new idea to detect such particles whose mass is well below the micro-eV scale, corresponding to Compton wavelengths much greater than the typical size of tabletop experiments. The approach involves detecting axion-induced transitions between two quasi-degenerate resonant modes of a superconducting accelerator cavity.

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Lundi mai 17, 2021
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Recently, an intriguing connection between the exceptional Jordan algebra h_3(O) and the standard model of particle physics was noticed by Dubois-Violette and Todorov (with further interpretation by Baez). How do the standard model fermions fit into this story? I will explain how they may be neatly incorporated by complexifying h_3(O) or, relatedly, by passing from RxO to CxO in the so-called "magic square" of normed division algebras.

 

 

Jeudi mai 13, 2021

The issue of whether quantum effects can affect gravity at cosmological distances still lacks a fundamental understanding, but there are indications of a non-trivial gravitational infrared dynamics. This possibility is appealing for building alternatives to the standard cosmological model and explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this talk I will discuss some large scale modifications of general relativity due to nonlocal terms, which are assumed to arise at the level of quantum effective action.

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Jeudi mai 13, 2021

Since their first discovery in 2015, gravitational-wave observations yielded several "surprises." The LIGO and Virgo observatories detected more and heavier black holes than anticipated; the first object in the lower mass gap was found; and LIGO announced the discovery of a particularly heavy black hole that could have not come from stellar core collapse. The surprises point to the possibility that some of LIGO/Virgo's black hole mergers occurred in the dense accretion disks of active galactic nuclei (AGNs).

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Mercredi mai 12, 2021

In recent years, random quantum circuits have played a central role in the theory of quantum computation. Much of this prominence is due to recent random quantum circuit sampling experiments which have constituted the first claims of "quantum supremacy".   While random quantum circuits enjoy certain advantages that make them ideal for implementation by near-term quantum experiments, it is unclear a priori why they should be difficult to simulate classically.

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Mercredi mai 12, 2021

The power of quantum information lies in its capacity to be non-local, encoded in correlations among entangled particles.  Yet our ability to produce, understand, and exploit such correlations is hampered by the fact that the interactions between particles are ordinarily local.  I will report on experiments in which we use light to engineer non-local interactions among cold atoms, with photons acting as messengers conveying information between them.  We program the spin-spin couplings in an array of atomic ensembles by tailoring the frequency spectrum of an optical control field.  We harnes

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